St Phillip’s Plaza Farmer’s Market | Tucson Farmer’s Market

St Phillip’s Plaza

Ah! . . . bummer . . . I like St Phillip’s Plaza farmer’s market, but, again, some store owners complained and I was asked to leave. Isn’t that selfish? I guess they consider me (or my book) a threat. 

Whoever complained is not only showing selfishness but also ignorance. Selfishness, because promoting my book does not hinder their business; the opposite is true: it adds to the place during that day of the week, just like the farmers do. Ignorance, because what is really wreaking havoc in our economy (and therefore hurting their business) are the mega banks: Chase, Bank of America, Citibank,  Wells Fargo etc., and I bet most of those store owners are banking with them, with the criminal banks that are causing the collapse of our system, with the banks that may cause their going out of business. (A Central Bank’s SchemeIt is interesting, isn’t it?

But I think The Eye of the Dragon will survive anyway; it is indeed a timely book. You can check it out right here: The Eye of the Dragon: Stalking Castaneda and even look inside the book. Enjoy! It has a message for you.

Digression | Presence

I was caught by the flu last weekend. It came out of the blue; I had been feeling great and the weather couldn’t have been better. San Diego, CA almost always has a summer breeze.

Isn’t it amazing how a simple virus can reduce a human being to a sniveling, panting heap of pain and discomfort? You can feel miserable enough to see your death staring at you; some viruses do kill. One positive thing about getting sick is that it can give you some perspective; it points out to us the impermanence of all life. All we have is the moment we live.

The flu made me think about the most important thing we can have…

Our actions are frequently affected by worries and influenced by misleading assumptions that stem from our aimless self-reflection. It is our undisciplined and relentless mind that produces irresponsible or base behavior induced by irrational fears, which originate in non-existent sources or situations. Reality is warped by the wandering mind; reality is not what we think (our concepts and ideas). Thus, the most important thing we do is to discipline our minds to focus on reality as it is now. It is interesting to note that human beings have the uncanny ability to ignore the obvious.

Although all sages from the beginning of time have stressed the importance of having presence of mind, we refuse to see the necessity of it. We refuse to see what it can do for us. To try to simplify something rather complex I would say that it does three things for us: Physically speaking, presence can even save our lives by helping us be aware of what is coming at us; mentally, it will eliminate stress because stress dwells either in a non-existent future or a past that we refuse to let go; and spiritually, it will help us to see that we are never separate from the Source–“be still and know that I am God”–psalms 46:10.

Now, it is true that I don’t know anybody that can be mindful at all times, but just trying our best (just our best) makes a big difference. And with a disciplined mind comes equanimity and inner balance whether we have or have not. And bear in mind that “having” and “having not” are always subject to change, so the most important thing we have is our presence of mind.

I know I am digressing in this post, but isn’t everything interconnected? What do you think?

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