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Arunachala / God in a Hill / Tiruvannamalai

India is an incredible country. I am not going to try to describe it now; I just got here. Busy! But a few pictures of the Ashram are enclosed.

MonkeyI opened the faucet for this monkey to drink, and, after he finished, he threatened me (I have witnesses). Someone said he did that because he didn’t know me. You figure!

IMG_2777Meditation Hall

ArunachalaArunachala

Home of Ramana Maharshi 

IMG_2779Tiruvannamalai’s Temple

MonkeysTaking a nap across the dinning hall at the Ashram.

Don’t be misled. They can be aggressive. I saw one forcefully trying to steal a bag from a lady. He was stopped by the yells of a passerby. I was taken aback by the surprise attack. I know better now.

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Tsunami of Music | World Music News Wire | From India to Indonesia

Tsunami of Music

From World Music News Wire:

“On a beach, a fisherman pours his heart into a love song for his wife, taken by the sea. A worn but beautiful woman, at first shy and retiring, sings an unexpectedly passionate welcome. A couple selling trinkets to sun-hungry tourists opens an arresting trove of traditional instruments and plays them with astounding zeal.

On the shores of great tragedy and destruction, the sounds and images of the Laya Project reveal an abundance of life-affirming music made by ordinary villagers, sounds from coastal communities affected by the 2004 tsunami in Sri Lanka, Thailand, Indonesia, the Maldives, India, and Myanmar (Burma). Recorded on site during impromptu sessions over the course of more than two years in dozens of overlooked areas, the interwoven songs and tunes that became the Project span national, ethnic, and religious boundaries and reflect a unifying triumph of human resilience and creativity.”

More at: http://www.worldmusicwire.com

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