Advertisements

Form is Emptiness | Everything Connected | Bitcoin

I recently saw this video Form is emptiness by Nassim Haramein, explaining from a scientific point of view  (equations and all) what the  Buddha said a few thousand years ago: Form is emptiness; emptiness is form. Although the presentation lacks the inner (spiritual) side, I thought it was amazing. I think you’ll probably enjoy the video; it is well explained.

In part of the video he explains that life is a way for the Spirit to become aware of Itself; we provide feedback. And we provide feedback when we are It, when we are in “dreamless sleep.” He doesn’t use these words in the video; he calls it visiting the vacuum (it is a full vacuum / emptiness is form), disappearing momentarily, like an electron does, to appear again after the feedback is exchanged. And it brought me to think how important it is what we tell the Spirit; this dream is co-created. Like he says, what are we telling It? And what is It telling us? Do you see what I mean? Do you see how important our actions are? A very small action can have significant repercussions later; there are no small decisions.

It brought me to the importance of the right action. Humanity is at a crossroads at the moment, every exchange between us and the Spirit is important. All of our actions and thoughts are important.

Then I got to thinking how everything is connected, how at the moment while malevolence is hovering over humanity (the designs of the corporate oligarchy: the Federal Reserve, 9/11 wars, government surveillance etc.) science is getting to the unity of It all. And when we were thinking that the mega banks were perhaps indestructible, Bitcoin is growing to perhaps show us that maybe they aren’t, and there is hope for humanity to break away from economic slavery and a degrading socioeconomic system. We can make it happen; we just have to do the right thing. What are we telling the Spirit?

*  *  * 

After I came across this book, I did some research, and what I found is quite interesting.

Bitcoinby Phil Weaver

The Ultimate Guide to Bitcoin 

“Bitcoin is not only a revolution in money. It is a revolution with powerful implications in freedom itself. Learn why bitcoin is much more than just an investment. It is the democratization of money. And with that is has the power to level the world’s financial playing field, destroying crony capitalism and dictatorial governments without a moment of violence.” 

I think I might dig into this further. You can look for it in Amazon (or google it) and see what you find. Remember there are no small actions, do your best and spread the word. Do you know Bitcoin?

Wired published an interesting article about it:

The Rise and Fall of Bitcoin | Wired Magazine | Wired.com

Check the sites above, do your homework and spread the word.

Everything is interconnected!

Advertisements

Financial System | Mess | Wired Magazine

Jack Dunning, the publisher of Computor Edge, just wrote an excellent compendium (the original articles were   published in Wired Magazine) about the reasons our financial system is in shambles. Something else we have to consider, however, is the selfish greed and the lack of integrity, which caused the causes. We have to consider that a lack of morality can, and will, wreak havoc in our financial system and in our society as a whole.

The Compendium:

“There is an excellent article in Wired Magazine that goes a long way toward explaining how the financial system became the mess we see today. It seems that there is a formula that was devised for calculating risk for the complex securities being manufactured by financial institutions. It simplified the risk decision-making process. It was used almost everywhere to evaluate complicated packages. The formula was fatally flawed.

The problem is that the risk involved in these complex mixes of financial instruments have too many dependencies on seemingly unrelated events to properly evaluate them. The fact is that the vast majority of people, including the “financial analyst,” didn’t have the math skills to evaluate the paper they were trading. The formula was used as the panacea. While the times were good, it seemed that the financial markets could do no wrong—and the formula seemed to work. But once there was a kink (bad mortgages), the house of cards collapsed. The formula is now useless, and there is nothing to replace it—yet.

Most of the problem paper in the financial markets does not have a value of zero, but banks are reluctant to buy or sell them precisely because they don’t know how much they are worth. The buyers don’t want to pay too much, while the sellers fear getting too little. Part of the complication is the fact that even individual mortgages have been divided between numerous packages. If you tried to track down who actually owns the mortgage on your house (not the bank who collects the payments), you could find that pieces of your mortgage are in hundreds, if not thousands, of different securities.

People are screaming for more government oversight, but there is no evidence that hiring more civil servants will help resolve anything. It’s been admitted at the SEC that once they get information, they often don’t know what to do with it. Nor is the problem the lack of information. It’s been argued that there is so much information available through regular mandated disclosure that the useless boiler plate overwhelms the buried, more vital figures. The government has mandated transparency through disclosure, yet the mountains of disclosed data overwhelm analysis. Who is capable of sifting through it all?

A companion article in the same issue of Wired argues that the only real requirement for fixing the financial mess is full disclosure of all the data, not to the government, but to the public. Once the data gets into the hands of geeks and nerds everywhere, the process of turning it into useful information begins. No oversight body will ever have the wherewithal, or talent, to provide information that will actually protect the public from the stupidity of financial institutions. There will always be ways for financial managers to beat the government regulations and march down a lucrative, yet dangerous, road.

Last week’s column by Dawn Clement about the massive networks of home computers chugging away in kitchens all over the world working to solve complex problems may demonstrate a model for future financial analysis. If the government tries to do it, it won’t get done—although they will spend billions while not doing it. Plus, the task may be too daunting and expensive a proposition for private enterprise. A distributed system of home computers each doing its piece of a financial analysis problem could provide more computing power than the biggest supercomputer, while offering up true transparency to those who really need it—the people. All that is required is for the data to be made available to everyone. Someone will start doing something with it. Then the oversight of our financial and securities markets will truly come from the people.

Jack is the publisher of ComputorEdge Magazine. He’s been with the magazine since first issue on May 16, 1983. Back then, it was called The Byte Buyer. His Web site is . He can be reached at www.computoredge.com or ceeditor@computoredge.com

%d bloggers like this: