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Form is Emptiness | Everything Connected | Bitcoin

I recently saw this video Form is emptiness by Nassim Haramein, explaining from a scientific point of view  (equations and all) what the  Buddha said a few thousand years ago: Form is emptiness; emptiness is form. Although the presentation lacks the inner (spiritual) side, I thought it was amazing. I think you’ll probably enjoy the video; it is well explained.

In part of the video he explains that life is a way for the Spirit to become aware of Itself; we provide feedback. And we provide feedback when we are It, when we are in “dreamless sleep.” He doesn’t use these words in the video; he calls it visiting the vacuum (it is a full vacuum / emptiness is form), disappearing momentarily, like an electron does, to appear again after the feedback is exchanged. And it brought me to think how important it is what we tell the Spirit; this dream is co-created. Like he says, what are we telling It? And what is It telling us? Do you see what I mean? Do you see how important our actions are? A very small action can have significant repercussions later; there are no small decisions.

It brought me to the importance of the right action. Humanity is at a crossroads at the moment, every exchange between us and the Spirit is important. All of our actions and thoughts are important.

Then I got to thinking how everything is connected, how at the moment while malevolence is hovering over humanity (the designs of the corporate oligarchy: the Federal Reserve, 9/11 wars, government surveillance etc.) science is getting to the unity of It all. And when we were thinking that the mega banks were perhaps indestructible, Bitcoin is growing to perhaps show us that maybe they aren’t, and there is hope for humanity to break away from economic slavery and a degrading socioeconomic system. We can make it happen; we just have to do the right thing. What are we telling the Spirit?

*  *  * 

After I came across this book, I did some research, and what I found is quite interesting.

Bitcoinby Phil Weaver

The Ultimate Guide to Bitcoin 

“Bitcoin is not only a revolution in money. It is a revolution with powerful implications in freedom itself. Learn why bitcoin is much more than just an investment. It is the democratization of money. And with that is has the power to level the world’s financial playing field, destroying crony capitalism and dictatorial governments without a moment of violence.” 

I think I might dig into this further. You can look for it in Amazon (or google it) and see what you find. Remember there are no small actions, do your best and spread the word. Do you know Bitcoin?

Wired published an interesting article about it:

The Rise and Fall of Bitcoin | Wired Magazine | Wired.com

Check the sites above, do your homework and spread the word.

Everything is interconnected!

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Teachers | Buddhas | Enlightenment . . . and all that Jazz

“If you meet the Buddha on the road, kill him”

What I understand this quote to mean (please correct me if I am wrong) is that a Teacher can only show the way; the pupil most do the work. What the Buddha “saw” is what He saw; I will “see” it only with practice. A Buddha (Teacher) does not wants us to follow him blindly but to be Buddhas ourselves. Or to paraphrase H Gunaratana, your own practice (stillness) will get you to see, your own experience (seeing) is all that counts. Actually we are all Buddhas (enlightened) ourselves; we are never apart from the Source. It is the ego who pulls the wool over our eyes with explanations and dissertations and makes us act like nincompoops. Random thought is a trap that puts us to sleep; we just need to wake up.

Ultimately, “It” is within ourselves and all around us, right here, right now. All we need to do is “just see it”. Simple!


Razor Wire Dharma by Calvin Malone | A Buddhist in Prison


I recently read Razor-Wire Dharma, and found a true practitioner of Buddhism. Calvin Malone found Buddhism in jail, and through his practice released himself (and others) from the bondage of the ego-mind.

My favorite chapter is the one about the apple, in which, through mindfulness he sees the Whole in an awakening moment. It is similar to what Brad Warner experienced while eating an orange in one of his books (Hardcore Zen?).

What makes Mr. Malone’s book so remarkable is his position; he is practicing under adverse circumstances, and under extreme pressure at times. He is being a guide to cellmates who sometimes even steal from him. He is practicing compassion and balance in a place in which a wrong move can cost you your life, and obscene, offensive language is the norm.

He is an example for all of us.

Bassui | Rinzai Zen Master | 1327-1387

In 1387 (at the age of 61), as Bassui was sitting in zazen meditation among his followers, he turned to them and shouted twice, “Look directly! What is this? Look in this manner and you won’t be deceived!”. He then died.

As a young man Bassui had many questions, ones like “What is a soul?” and “Who is this that hears, sees and understands?” These are questions he would struggle with for a good portion of his life. He would pursue this style of inquiry in meditation, one day realizing that the soul is ungraspable due to its inherent emptiness.


Buddha | Prajnaparamita | Anne Bancroft

250px-sermon_in_the_deer_park_depicted_at_wat_chedi_liem-kayess-1There is a tiny book out there that can fit in anybody’s shirt pocket. It is titled, the pocket Buddha reader. It was edited by Anne Bancroft; and it has outstanding selections of the Buddha’s teachings. Below, I am adding an interesting excerpt (pg 33) to give you an idea.

“…the infinitely varied forms of this world, in all their relativity, far from being a hindrance and a dangerous distraction to the spiritual path, are really a healing medicine. Why? Because by the very fact that they are interdependent on each other and therefore have no separate self, they express the mystery and the energy of all-embracing love. Not just the illumined wise ones but every single being in the interconnected world is a dweller in the boundless infinity of love”. –Prajnaparamita (The perfection of  Wisdom)

A note from Wikipedia: “The Perfection of Wisdom Sutras or Prajñāpāramitā Sutras are a genre of Mahayana Buddhist scriptures dealing with the subject of the Perfection of Wisdom. The term Prajñāpāramitā alone never refers to a specific text, but always to the class of literature.” www.wikipedia.com

“Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will.”–Mohandas Gandhi

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Buddhism | Non-Attachment | Brad Warner

Although I am not a Buddhist I think the Buddha is one the greatest teachers the world has ever known. And one of the  Buddhist authors I recommend to better understand Buddhism is Brad Warner. In the excerpt below he clarifies the usually misunderstood concept of non-attachment. I think it is worth your time.

Brad Warner’s Hardcore Zen: Attached to Non-Attachment

“There is an idea within Zen Buddhist philosophy that’s sometimes expressed with the word “non-attachment.” But it has nothing to do with the weird belief that we should all be completely aloof from everything in life. Dogen, the 13th century monk who wrote extensively about Zen, talks some about not being attached to self and not being attached to views. But this is a completely different thing from cultivating an attitude where a person strives to be an island unto him or herself, loving nothing, caring about nothing and generally just not giving a shit about much at all.

The notion that we should cultivate such an attitude is extremely dangerous. It’s one of those beliefs that cult leaders use to dominate a community. We all form attachments to those close to us. When we’re told to cut ties with family and friends and with the mainstream society, we’ll naturally form ties with the community and its leader. That’s a very slippery slope. Even when the community and its leader start off relatively cool, that kind of power corrupts quickly and thoroughly.

The don’t-give-a-shit attitude cultivated by far too many who proudly label themselves Buddhists is one of those things that people who dislike Buddhism always use to trash it. And rightly so, because it’s a crap idea! Unfortunately for them, the idea isn’t Buddhism at all. It’s a kind of psychosis — what the psychiatric community calls sociopathy. That’s not what Buddhist practice is intended to bring about.

In fact, this bizarre idea of “non-attachment” runs completely counter to the Buddhist worldview. It’s utterly impossible for anyone ever to be unattached in that way. What we call self and what we call non-self are one and the same. Our real attachments to everyone and everything we encounter run so deep and strong we couldn’t possibly break them no matter how hard we tried. We are fundamentally attached to everything. And of course you’re going to form even deeper attachments to those people and things that are more closely related to you, like your family, friends and home. Don’t sweat it.

Non-attachment to self and views is something entirely different. It means not trying to force yourself to be one single solid unchangeable thing forever and ever world without end amen. What you call your “self” is constantly in a state of flux, mutating and metamorphosing at every moment. But most of us fight against that. We try to establish a fixed personality — a “self.” We waste all kinds of energy defining and defending this fiction we’ve worked hard to create. Stop doing that and you’re free to use all that energy in far more constructive and beneficial ways. Personally, I don’t think the word “non-attachment” is a very good way of describing this so I don’t use it (FYI, even in the passages I referred to, Dogen never actually used the word “non-attachment” since he didn’t write in English).

As far as your attachment to the things you ought to be attached to is concerned, the worst that Buddhist practice is going to do is to make you a little less emotionally frantic about that stuff. When my mom died last year, I didn’t sit around all glassy eyed going, “I have no grief for, lo, I am not attached.” I cried. Hard. But at the same time I didn’t hang on to my grief as tightly as I might have.

Let’s take grief as a case in point that’s applicable to the rest of what we might call emotional attachments. The initial wave of grief you feel at the loss of someone you love just happens. No need to dwell on how or why. It’s just there. And you react; you cry or feel sullen or act in whatever way your cultural upbringing has conditioned you to respond. After that, though, is where things get complicated. The habit of latching onto emotions and incorporating them into the sense of self is so strong that we’ll grab on hard to even the most unpleasant feelings that come along. We hang on for dear life lest our sense of who we are should collapse if we let go. We very literally feel like we’ll die if we don’t. Habits like this have us abusing our bodies and minds in ways that lead to all kinds of trouble. But they’re not necessary. You won’t vanish if you stop reinforcing your image of who you are at every moment.

You can’t undo habits this deep instantly. You shouldn’t even try. But once you become aware of them you find that you always have a clear choice whether to respond habitually or not. Not responding habitually doesn’t mean you become cold, robotic and “non-attached” in the sense a lot of people seem to envision non-attachment. It just means you don’t push your body/mind more than it needs to be pushed.

You still love all the people you loved before. You may even hate the same people you hated before. Even hate doesn’t have to be a terrible thing when you don’t latch onto it and call it your self. It arises and fades away like any other emotion and there’s no need to act upon it. But that’s a topic too big to go into here. In any case, the kind of “attachments” the guy who wrote me that letter remain fully intact. You still love your family and your friends and your kitty cat too.

So don’t get all attached to the idea of non-attachment. OK?”

Brad Warner is the author of Hardcore Zen and Sit Down and Shut Up! He maintains a blog about Buddhist stuff and a My Space Page  too. If you’re in Southern California and you want to try some Zazen for yourself, he has a group that meets every Saturday in Santa Monica.

His blog: www.hardcorezen.blogspot.com

The Diamond Sutra | Buddha | Excerpts

250px-sermon_in_the_deer_park_depicted_at_wat_chedi_liem-kayess-1Today I read the Diamond Sutra.

If you are ready, check it out. Like a diamond, it cuts through concepts and beliefs. You can find it in “A Buddhist Bible” by  Dwight Goddard.

Excerpts:

Then Buddha asked Subhuti, “What do you think, Subhuti, has the Buddha arrived at the highest, most fulfilled, most awakened and enlightened mind? Does the Buddha teach any teaching?”

Subhuti replied, “As far as I have understood the lord Buddha’s teachings, there is no independently existing object of mind called the highest, most fulfilled, awakened or enlightened mind. Nor is there any independently existing teaching that the Buddha teaches. Why? Because the teachings that the Buddha has realized and spoken of cannot be conceived of as separate, independent things and therefore cannot be described. The truth in them is uncontainable and inexpressible. It neither is, nor is it not. What does this mean? What this means is that Buddhas and disciples are not enlightened by a set method of teachings, but by an internally intuitive process which is spontaneous and is part of their own inner nature.”

******************

“Regard this fleeting world

As a star at dawn, a bubble in a stream,

A flash of lightning in a summer cloud,

A flickering lamp, a phantom and a dream”

–The Buddha, Diamond Sutra

http://www.diamond-sutra.com/diamond_sutra_translation.html

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