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The Matrix / “Is This Scary?” / Internet of Things / 5G

Red Pill

Red Pill / Blue Pill

Humanity is trapped by the belief that there is evolution in technology. In the video attached, Mr. Hoffman doesn’t realize that what he is proposing as “new technology” is extremely old. Technology may be useful, but the technology that he is promoting as “the future of the brain” is just the Matrix at work: a chip in your brain connected to the Internet to exchange and access knowledge—united to everything.

The author is confused and thinks this is evolution (progress).  It is not!

Our problem is that we lack the discipline, the concentration, the intent to find who we really are and see our connection to everything. We already have everything he says we can attain, and we already have the connection; we are That. We just don’t see it. And this new “amazing” technology will just be the prime tool of the slave masters—it’s misleading; it’s a trap.

Please click on the link below, and tell me what you think.

The Internet of Things

“The Kingdom of the Father is spread out upon the earth, and men do not see it.”—Gospel of Thomas

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The Forest Moon | Reincarnation | Enlightenment

The Forest Moon in Thumb Butte, AZ (Click to enlarge)

I was recently talking to a friend over dinner and the subject of reincarnation came up. I said there is no reincarnation.

I know, some Buddhists (including the Dalai Lama) believe there is reincarnation. But if the Buddha explained that there is no “self,” who is reincarnating? Hindus believe in reincarnation. And Paramahansa Yogananda, a very respected spiritual master, stressed reincarnation, with proof. But Hindus do stress that only the “Self” exist; everything else is an illusion, a projection–including time and space. So, it would be an “illusion,” reincarnating into a bigger “illusion.” Right? It gets complicated, doesn’t it? I suggest that what we need to do is forget other lives until we master this life, our present challenge. Once we do that everything will be revealed to us, and there will be no more doubts or beliefs. We will know and be free.

This reminds me of an interesting question: Are you enlightened? “I” can’t be enlightened because “I” is the problem. In fact, everybody is enlightened but that “I” pulls the wool over our eyes and doesn’t let us know. If  “I” am looking  for enlightenment, “I” am missing the point and making enlightenment one more item on my “I want list.” All we need to do is drop that “I” with its incessant jabber and selfish wants, and . . . wake up!

The moon is a symbol of enlightenment in Zen Buddhism.

Good and Evil . . . Are they there? | A Buddhist Thought

University Ave. Tucson AZ

I was at University Avenue doing an improvised book signing,  when Michael (whom I had previously met there) stopped by to chat. He had been perusing my blog, and didn’t agree with the way I used the word “evil.” He prefers to use “detrimental.” I can understand his view: there is no “I” that we can (or should) be judgmental about and classify as evil; and there is cause and effect, and the responsibility of humanity as a whole. Indeed!

But in the world of form the ego holds the baton, and it can be the source of extremely “detrimental” actions, which can be considered “evil.” (Evil meaning: “profoundly immoral and malevolent.”) Self-importance can turn a group of people into homicidal maniacs, who can kill 3,000 people to blame somebody else AE 9/11 Truth and make a fortune by killing even more people. I would consider that an “evil deed.” Don’t you think?

If you let me define morality as the way we treat other human beings: our family, friends, neighbors and everybody else, the act described above is not only immoral; it is “evil,” because the persons responsible are not only immoral but also sociopaths without a conscience.

In this world, although a dream, we do need morality because within this construction, the great suffering caused by the ego is obvious. Due to the ego, evil does exist  in this enormous stage, and that ego-mind must be understood and disciplined. Therefore, we have responsibilities to meet, a challenge to face.

“What we are is the result of what we have thought,
is built by our thoughts, is made up of our thoughts.
If one speaks or acts with an impure thought,
suffering follows one, like the wheel of the cart follows the foot of the ox.”–Buddha 

An undisciplined mind will unavoidably lead us astray, toward “detrimental,” “bad,” or even “evil” acts; and that is where suffering comes from. And if there is a selfish entity who is causing enormous  suffering , (with predetermination) for personal gain, that entity and its actions are “evil.” Wouldn’t you say?

Buddhism | Who are we?

Dogen Zenji

It cracks me up when I hear somebody say, “I am a Buddhist”. Because, to my knowledge, it was the Buddha who said. “Don’t say ‘I am this or I am that“.  And with reason, for as soon as we say, “I am this” (Buddhist or whatever) we create a separation from anyone who is “that”. We destroy Unity. Don’ we?

What the great sages have always taught is an intelligent way of life, a life with presence and morality. We don’t have to be anything in particular, but just “be” and do unto others as we would have others do unto us. We don’t need a membership to anything.

Presence! What does it mean?

I recently came across an article in a Buddhist magazine in which the author stated that we can’t help but being present because we are always here in bodily form; we can’t be anywhere else. Then he proceeded on a tangent of thought that I can’t remember at the moment; it was irrelevant anyway.

He was misunderstanding what “presence” is. If our body is here but our mind is in some distant past, unforeseeable future or imaginary situation, we are not present. Our mind is running away with us. Our presence of mind is gone. We are not awake.

Right thought is the thought placed in what we are doing or experiencing in the present moment. The mind is stilled then; that is, present.

Razor Wire Dharma by Calvin Malone | A Buddhist in Prison


I recently read Razor-Wire Dharma, and found a true practitioner of Buddhism. Calvin Malone found Buddhism in jail, and through his practice released himself (and others) from the bondage of the ego-mind.

My favorite chapter is the one about the apple, in which, through mindfulness he sees the Whole in an awakening moment. It is similar to what Brad Warner experienced while eating an orange in one of his books (Hardcore Zen?).

What makes Mr. Malone’s book so remarkable is his position; he is practicing under adverse circumstances, and under extreme pressure at times. He is being a guide to cellmates who sometimes even steal from him. He is practicing compassion and balance in a place in which a wrong move can cost you your life, and obscene, offensive language is the norm.

He is an example for all of us.

Non-Attachment | The Buddha’s Teachings | Thich Thien An

“When Zhuang-Tzu’s wife died, his friend the philosopher Hui Shih went to his house to console him and found him not weeping and wailing as one might expect, but laughing and singing. Asked how he could be so ungrateful to his wife, the sage replied :”When she has just died, I could not help being affected. Soon, however, I examined the matter from the very beginning. At the very beginning, she was not living, having no form, not even substance. But somehow or rather, there was then her substance, then her form and then her life. Now by a further change, she has died. The whole process is like the sequence of the four seasons – spring, summer, autumn and winter. While she is thus lying in the great mansion of the universe, for me to go about weeping and wailing would be to proclaim myself ignorant of the natural laws. Therefore I stop.” From this story we learn that the key to happiness is non-attachment, and the secret of ono-attachment is right understanding.”

“METHOD OF PRACTICE
A common method to help the student lessen his attachment is the koan method of Rinzai Zen. The koan is a philosophical topic given to a Zen student for meditation by the Zen master. It may consist of a single word, a phrase, a sentence or a short passage. A most famous koan is called “the sound of one hand clapping.” Everybody knows what the sound of two hands clapping is like, but what it the sound of one hand clapping ? That is the koan. The student meditates on it until he can hear the sound of one hand clapping. Many of us have heard the sound of silence. If we can hear that sound, then we can hear the sound of one hand clapping also. This koan does not stop with hearing of not hearing, but goes further. If we can hear the sound of one hand, why can we hear it, and how can we hear it ?
If not, why not ? Where does the sound come from, and where does it go ? What is the nature of the sound, and what is the nature of the sound, and what is the nature of hearing ? If their koan is solved, the meditator may consider that he has experienced kensho.”
Source : Zen Philosophy, Zen Practice, Dharma Publishing, College of Oriental Studies, 1975, PP104-112.

These excerpts are from Non attachment, an excellent article in non-attachment.

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